Deer Antler Velvet Has Been Used in Traditional Medicine For Thousands of Years!

When it comes to ancient or traditional medicines, almost everything was attempted. The discovery of medicinal benefits could make all the difference for small remote villages. Kudos to the early physician who chose to attempt using deer antler velvet as a method of helping with medical issues. 

Like many traditional medical treatments, deer antler velvet hasn’t fully been scientifically vetted, or has produced mixed results in tests. Most of the benefits come from anecdotal sources. However, with the number of people looking at alternatives to chemical based drugs, many natural options are very popular. If people find themselves benefitting from them, it needs to be explored! This article will focus on deer antler velvet. Where is it coming from and how is it used? It will attempt to determine the actual benefits of using deer velvet.

What is It? 

Deer antler velvet (or simply deer velvet) is a substance that comes from the antlers of the deer. Specifically it comes from immature deer antlers. These antlers actually have a sort of hair that grows on them which has that trademark feeling of velvet textiles. The antlers are composed of cartilage at this point, and are full of minerals, hormones, protein, fat and other compounds. It’s these compounds that have caused people to use the deer velvet in a variety of medicinal doses and treatments.

Traditional Uses

Typically, deer antler velvet is applied one of two ways. Some people may take it as a form of pill, while others can get it in an aerosol cream or spray. Deer antler velvet has been used in various ways. It started with ancient chinese medicine approximately 2000 years ago, give or take a few centuries.

The first uses were in tonics that were supposed to improve a person’s bone health and enrich the blood. There are specific hormones in deer velvet that can potentially encourage growth, so the use of it for bone health actually makes a lot of sense. Many people were using it in an effort to increase their sexual performance. It’s also been used for a variety of individual issues like skin problems, joint weakness, urinary infections, anemia, weak immune systems, heart functions, lung strength and nerve function.

Potential Benefits

It’s important to note that the potential benefits are still yet to be truly determined. The benefits given by people haven’t all been proven through scientific studies at this point. Many of the potential benefits have been briefly talked about in the uses section. Possible benefits include: 

  • Pain Reduction - Many people who have taken deer antler velvet have stated that it helps with their arthritis pain. 
  • Energy - Anemia can reduce the amount of energy that people have due to the lack of oxygen being transmitted around the body. Some people have found that their energy returns when using deer antler velvet. 
  • Stress Relief - Whether this is a natural effect or the potential placebo effect (never underestimate it) of using deer antler velvet, the reported stress relief is certainly welcome. Stress is dangerous. 
  • Physical Improvement - Some studies have suggested that deer antler velvet could have some benefit on physical endurance. Others have shown minimal increase in aerobic capacity, so the benefits are mostly anecdotal at this point. 
  • Minimal Side Effects - Studies haven’t really found much in the way of side effects or on the toxic effects. The only potential issues that may have been discovered is the potential for chronic wasting disease.

It’s important to always talk to your doctor before taking a supplemental treatment like this. Even though it’s considered a part of chinese or natural medicine, it’s crucial to discuss such treatments with your doctor first.

Disclaimer: The content on Healthexchange.org is not meant to endorse self-management of any health or wellness issue. Also, the content is not meant to endorse any one particular type of treatment. With all treatment or advice used, individuals may experience varying results. Website visitors with health-related questions, are always encouraged to seek a proper consultation with a medical professional or other certified healthcare provider. The content on Healthexchange.org should not be used to ignore or prevent the use of any medical or health-related advice, nor should it be used to delay a consultation with a medical professional or other certified healthcare provider.

The content on Healthexchange.org should not solely be used to start the using dietary supplements and vitamins, natural and herbal products, homeopathic medicine and other mentioned products prior to a consultation with a medical professional or other certified healthcare provider.